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Precinct 10 is an upbeat and modern take on an early 1900s Prohibition-era speakeasy complete with vintage fixtures, distressed wood & brick, plush red velvet seating, a cozy cocktail lounge with leather couches and all the seductiveness and secretiveness that dim lighting and no windows can offer - paying homage to America at the beginning of the last century.

We are often asked, "why no windows?!" Well, a speakeasy, so called because of the practice of speaking quietly about such a place in public, or when inside it so as not to alert the police or neighbors, is an illicit establishment that sells alcoholic beverages. Such establishments came into prominence in the United States during the Prohibition era (1920–1933). During that time, the sale, manufacture, and transportation (bootlegging) of alcoholic beverages was illegal throughout the United States.

Speakeasies largely disappeared after Prohibition was ended in 1933, and the term is now used to describe some retro style bars, like P10 for example, which aim to revive the feel and energy of days gone by and pay respect to a different time and place.

THE TREE:

The sale, manufacture and transportation of alcohol during the 1920s was illegal – but that didn't stop creative entrepreneurs! A certain great-grandfather of the family was one such "businessman" and crafted his own illicit cocktails and liquors in his bathtub (A.K.A. "Bathtub Gin") and would then bottle it and transport it to the various speakeasies in his neighborhood of Roxbury. So as to not raise suspicion, he would wrap the bottles in a blanket and push them along the sidewalk in a baby carriage to ensure safe passage.

Bottles that were not sold had to be stored somewhere for safe-keeping and so a small makeshift cellar was dug in the back yard of his house directly beneath a giant oak tree.

The hand-carved oak tree located next to our bar here inside Precinct 10 symbolizes our family history in the alcohol and bar business (however shadily it began thanks to our great-grandfather!) as well as our ties to Prohibition and speakeasies many decades ago.

WHAT'S IN A NAME – PRECINCT 10:

There is something just so inherently American in the legend of speakeasies and Prohibition and so we set out to create a unique American restaurant here in Weymouth. Being around election season in late 2016, immediately we began to come up with names that revolved around American politics. Our address here at 110 Main Street falls inside of voting precinct 10.

Hynes Restaurant Group founder and owner, Kevin Hynes, before delving into the world of restaurants, was a Weymouth police officer – and for 10 years. Many link the word "precinct" not only to politics but also to law and so the name rings true on both levels. In addition to those obvious connotations, Precinct 10 also marks the 10th restaurant opened and owned by Kevin (and the Hynes Restaurant Group) on the South Shore over the course of his career.

P10's menu features regional American fare, a kind of "greatest hits from around the country" including house-made sausages, an array of house-smoked meats right out of our custom southern-style smoker, San Francisco Seafood Stew, Hawaiian Mahi Tacos, Southern Fried Chicken, Cajun Paella, New England Haddock and a wide selection of foods that make American cuisine fun and tasty!